Jun 11 2015

Sick Selfies App To Encourage Vaccinations

An man in Albuquerque, New Mexico is working on a sick selfies app to encourage vaccinations.

From the article on KRQE.com:

Here’s how the app works. You take a selfie or a photo of a friend. You can then select the photo and adjust it through the app so that your face is framed up. Then comes the part that’s supposed to get you thinking- you can give yourself measles or small pox, the only disease that’s been eradicated in the wild.

Here’s the video:

Creepy? Maybe. OK, definitely. The comments on the story are equally creepy though:

How sick! Vaccination is an organised [sic] criminal enterprise dressed up as disease prevention by means of junk science.

Yeah. Because that’s true. #sarcasm

The app does seem like a weird way to get parents to vaccinate their kids. But as the comment above shows, anti-vaccination folks are a tough crowd to convince.

On a related note, I may have to start checking the news in Albuquerque for weird stories. It’s no Florida, but only because nothing — NOTHING — compares to Florida when it comes to wild and wacky stories. But Albuquerque could have items worth posting. I found this “sick selfies app” story because of the bikers who helped a 5-year-old girl when she was bullied.

Source: App aims to encourage vaccinations with sick selfies | KRQE News 13

Mar 02 2015

Vaccination Nation Continues

File this under “things that shouldn’t be a debate but are.” With no medical or scientific evidence to support a link between vaccines and certain undesirable medical conditions such as autism, many parents insist that they know better. Or at least that someone else knows better. (Usually it’s someone on the Internet.)

The making of a DNA vaccine.

The making of a DNA vaccine. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Many parents are asking doctors to “spread out” the vaccines that their children receive, according to the L.A. Times.

Personally I don’t know if spreading out the vaccines is such a terrible thing, but according to the L.A. Times, citing an article in the journal Pediatrics, “87% of the doctors [surveyed] agreed that when parents delay some or all of these vaccines, they are putting their children at risk of being sickened by a preventable disease.”

In spite of their concerns, many doctors are doing it anyway.

So. To sum up. Most doctors (in a particular survey, at least) think that spreading out vaccines is dangerous. But if a parent is noodgy enough, they’ll do it anyway.

This is not good medicine. I’m not saying that doctors are always right. Far from it. (Oy, the stories I could tell you.) But if a doctor truly believes, based on all of the information available to them, that their patients, who in this case are children under 2 years old and therefore can’t decide for themselves, should be vaccinated in a particular way, they should not be swayed by a parent who complains loudly enough.

Other doctors are taking a hard line on the issue, refusing to treat children who have not been vaccinated.

Considering that measles is making a comeback (see the Related articles links below), and that Rand Paul and other politicians have made anti-vaccination a political issue as well as a medical one, I think it’s safe to say that this issue won’t be going away anytime soon. Which is annoying because, to the best of my knowledge, the entire anti-vaccine campaign (such as it is) dates to the Lancet study which was shown to be COMPLETELY WRONG in 2010. (More on that here if you’re interested.) And yet, five years later, we’re still talking about it.


Small Pox

As I said before — zero deaths. That’s the goal. And it’s an achievable one. How? Science! Cue music.

Doctors often delay vaccines for children to appease parents – LA Times.